When the Chinese Didn’t Discover America – Fusang.

When examining the claim of the Chinese in pre-contact America, you quickly realize that all of the evidence to support this claim is interconnected in a way that, if you can prove one piece wrong, it pretty much proves all the evidence wrong. Still, we need someplace to start, and a mythical island somewhere in... Continue Reading →

When the Chinese Didn’t Discover America.

Another hopeful contender for the title of 'First in America' is the Chinese. This discovery is supported by a variety of evidence, including a Chinese Saga mentioning a land called Fusang, a questionable map showing the supposed coastline of California, a massive earthwork in the shape of a horse, and the an intrepid Admiral whose... Continue Reading →

Where the Vikings Weren’t – Beardmore Relics

This week we have another puzzler, unlike the Wisconsin Viking Horse Skull, we know these artifacts are real. The question becomes, how did they get here? In 1930 or 1931, a gold prospector named James Edward Dodd was prospecting just south of the Blackwater River (Elliott 1941a:254.) Dodd says while prospecting he blew up an old... Continue Reading →

Where the Vikings Weren’t – The Kensington Runestone.

Even though I’m only going to focus on one of the American Runestones (of which there are several), to date, none are thought to be authentic by anyone who is knowledgeable of such things. This doesn't stop the conspiratorially minded however. Probably the most popular of the American Runestones is the Kensington Runestone. Named for... Continue Reading →

Where the Vikings Weren’t – The Vinland Map

Vinland Map. The Vinland map is an interesting artifact, one that captured my attention as a child. Frankly, I think the evidence points to the map being a fake, but there are a some who still fight for it to be real. The Vinland map first surface in  1957 glued inside the of the cover of a bound volume of Hystoria Tartarorum (Feder 2006:119,... Continue Reading →

Where the Vikings Weren’t – The Newport Tower.

In our first installment of this series we looked over the actual factual, evidence of both Christopher Columbus and Leif Eiriksson discovering the Americas. Arguably, you could say Columbus discovered South America, and Leif the North. I would say, simply touching a rock on one park of a massive continent complex doesn't equal discovering both bits of America, but that's my opinion on the matter. Apparently some folks agree... Continue Reading →

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