Hobby Lobby and the Illegal Antiquities Trade with Donna Yates – Episode 78

Today we talk with Dr. Donna Yates about the recent Hobby Lobby decision and the illegal antiquities trade. What was Hobby Lobby doing, how does this fit into looting and the antiquities trade, and what exactly is this new Museum of the Bible in DC thing?

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Produced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

Indiana Jones and Pseudoarchaeology – Episode 77

Today we’re talking about Indiana JOnes a pseudoarchaeological elements that run through almost all off the movies. We talk about how Indy came to be, why the movies are so dang good, and where certain archaeological themes came from and why they last.

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Produced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

Islam, ISIS, and Black Market Artifacts with Nathan French – Episode 76

Today we talk with Nathan French from the University of Miami, Ohio. Nathan talks with us about Islam and the destruction of archaeological sites and artifacts in Isis controlled areas. We also talk about artifacts funneled into the black market by Isis and fleeing refugees.

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roduced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

Antiquities Laws and Regulations – Episode 75

On today’s episode, Sara, Jeb, and Ken talk about some of the big antiquities laws that are impacting resources around the country. These laws are in the news lately and it’s important to know where they came from, what they do, and why they need to stick around for a while.

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roduced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

No One Here But Us Subduction Zones.

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Chapter 10 in, The Lost History of Ancient America, opens with the mysterious Professor Julia Patterson seeming to answer a comment from a reader of Ancient America named Tamara Szalewski. Szalewski mentions an anomaly they’ve discovered while looking at Google Earth and other maps. Szalewski mentions how she wonders if the anomaly is already recorded due to Frank Joesph’s reporting on Lemuria and Atlantis. The area in question is a portion of the Juan De Fuca Plate in Cascades Subduction Zone, 12 miles off the coast of Oregon, between the Coos and Winchester Bays. Since the article is missing any actual pictures of the area in question, I went to Google Earth myself and got some images. Don’t get me wrong, Google earth is a great product, and it can be useful in a number of situations, but it can also be miss understood easily and won’t give a full picture of an area.

This is true even of high resolution satellite or LiDAR images. Because of this, archaeologists who use these images also implement Ground Truthing, which for us means going to the area in question and looking at it. Either we survey it, or excavate it, even underwater. We don’t just take an image at face value.

Unfortunately, the Google Earth images above are only a guess of what Szalewski might be talking about. There is no image provided of the area in question, only a very computer generated one of something looking like a pyramid and has absolutely no context as to what it is or where it is supposed to be.

Patterson does give us some idea of the location, and that’s what I used in Google Earth. To be honest, I don’t see anything that looks like a underwater city. This isn’t to say that there aren’t archaeological sites that have been found underwater, or drowned cities for that matter. But this area, and the Cobb Seamount mentioned in Patterson’s article, don’t appear to be either of those.

Patterson makes the claim that there is physical evidence of a sunken civilization off the coast of Washington State, but fails to cite this or provide any actual evidence in the article itself. This is odd considering Patterson is a professional archaeologist. One would think this would be second nature.

Patterson brings up the Cobb Seamount discovered in the 1950’s. Its mentioned in tandem with David Hatcher Childress and his book, Lost Cities of North and Central America. Patterson makes a reference to a citation that is supposed to be in this book. An article written in 1987 in the Seattle Times. I have tried to find this articles and can’t find anything on it, even in Childress’ book. If anyone can send me copy, that’d be great.

The article is attributed with the claim that there were man-made artifacts found in the sunken mountains. Artifacts dating to 18000 years before present. Plus the mummified corpses of porpoises and whales. I don’t know what one is supposed to do with the other, but there it is. What’s more, no explanation on how the date of 18000 years is reached. Finlay, and this is a repeating error in the book, BP and BCE are not the same thing, and later in the article Paterson swaps the two. Patterson isn’t the only author in the book to make this mistake, but as a professional archaeologist, she would know the difference.

After all this vagueness and lack of connections, or evidence, Patterson makes a astonishing series of statements:

“Perhaps, Washington State’s Cobb Seamount treasure trove of ancient materials is related to Oregon’s underwater feature, which suggests the layout of a huge population center. If so, both sides belong to a high culture that flourished on formerly dry territories, until melting glaciers at the end of the last ice age unleashed catastrophic flooding that elevated sea levels worldwide by 390 feet. (Patterson 2017:78-79)”

“As such, geology is in accord with archaeology when dating the Cobb Seamount artifacts to 18,000 years ago. (Patterson 2017:79)”

The problem is none of what Patterson is trying to conclude is supported by anything in the article. Most of the above statement is unsupported speculation. At no point has anything been provided to even build up the possibility of these claims. Her final claim that geology is in accordance with archaeology is simply out of the blue. Nothing has been provided to back it.

This article is almost exactly like chapter 9, where nothing is provided but speculation. Responsibility for this speculation is passed off onto others via the vague repeating of either a past article or the short retelling of a comment. It’s not an attempt to explain or answer, but to speculate. I’m not overly impressed with this at all, and it’s not at all helpful for building the book’s overall argument for transoceanic travelers in America.


If you’d like to support this blog, consider donating on Patreon or PayPal under ArchyFantasies@gmail.com
Want more on this topic? Go to: ArchyFantasies Reviews – The Lost History of Ancient America.
Comment below or send an email to ArchyFantasies@gmail.com.


Resources:

 

Childress, David

1992    Lost Cities of North and Central America. Adventures Unlimited Press. Il.

Patterson, Julia

2017    Sunken Civilization Found off Oregon? The Lost History of Ancient America, ed Frank Joseph. The Career Press, Inc. Wayne, NJ.

The Gungywamp – Episode 74

Today we talk about the mysterious Gungywamp located in Connecticut. We examine the similarities between it and other sites like Mystery Hill aka American Stonehenge. Why makes the Gungywamp so strange? Is it ley lines, spirits, mystical energies of the ancient celts?

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roduced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

Sunken Cities in Mysterious Michigan Lakes.

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Chapter 9 of the Lost History of Ancient America, is titled, Drowned Village of the Ancient Copper Miners, by Wayne N. May. It may as well be presented as a report of an article May read once.

This article is simply a retelling of a 2012 article from Ancient America, about a 2011 discovery by Scott Mitchim, where he claims to have found evidence of a now underwater copper workshop. One he somehow dates to about 4100 to 3200 years ago. Where these dates come from is not revealed to us in this article, so we’re just supposed to take it on faith that this is correct. Sadly, these are the least of the problems here.

May tells us that Mitchim claims the workshop is littered with artifacts both stone and copper. May tells us that these dates connect the artifacts to the elusive Ancient Copper Barons, who May believes were busily mining and shipping raw copper from the American continent to the Mediterranean to fuel the Bronze age. The same Ancient Copper Barons that we’ve never had any reason to accept as real, yet are as treated as fact here. Not only does May not bother to give any evidence to support these claims, he plainly, tells us that the location of said site is secret and unknown to any but Mitchim.

Published with the article are pictures of random, unidentified rock piles that look a lot like those supposedly under Rock Lake in Wisconsin. They also look a lot like the rock piles Mitchim tried to show to Scott Wolter in the first season of America Unearthed. In that episode even Wolter saw they looked modern, and basically fake. With no actual way to identify the murky photographs, at least none provided in this article, there’s no way to tell if any of this is real. I can speculate, and even my speculation runs that this is fake, but there’s no way to validate anything based on this article. Not my speculation, nor May’s insistence that it is real.

There’s not even a decent break down I can do about the article. It’s literally a “I read this article this one time and it said…” with one citation to an article published in Ancient American Magazine. There is no evidence provided, nor is it even offered. The images could be anything, and with the way the article is written, it could simply be putting words in the mouth of Mitchim, we have no way of knowing!

This has been the most disappointing of the articles so far. There isn’t even the appearance of providing evidence here. It’s like trying to argue there isn’t an invisible teapot orbiting the sun.


If you’d like to support this blog, consider donating on Patreon or PayPal under ArchyFantasies@gmail.com
Want more on this topic? Go to: ArchyFantasies Reviews – The Lost History of Ancient America.
Comment below or send an email to ArchyFantasies@gmail.com.


Resources:

May, Wayne N.

2017    Drowned Village of the Ancient Copper Miners. The Lost History of Ancient America, ed Frank Joseph. The Career Press, Inc. Wayne, NJ.

Göbekli Tepe, Bad Fox, No Comet – Episode 73

Today we talk with Jens Notroff from the Gobekli Tepe research project about the recent news stories about possible evidence for a comet strike at the ancient site. We look over the claims made in the paper ‘DECODING GÖBEKLI TEPE WITH ARCHAEOASTRONOMY: WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY?’ and compare that with ongoing research from the actual Gobekli Tepe site. 

Shout out to David Anderson for his help with the episode! Thanks again! 

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Produced by Chris Webster and Tristan Boyle

Archy! Where you at?

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So I might have fallen off the planet there for a minute, but I have a brief excuse! I moved…again… You’d think by now I’d have this post scheduling things down, but I don’t. Sorry about that. The good news is, I’m all moved, and life is settling down again. Summer will be on us soon and that means a brief break before my next stint in Grad School. Looking forward to that…

Anyway, Mondy should see a regularly scheduled post up, looking at drowned cities and things that dwell under the water. Until then, there’s always the Podcast to keep you entertained and Ken’s new book, Ancient America: Fifty Archaeological Sites to See for Yourself, if you want something inspiring to read.

 

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