The 10 Most Not-So-Puzzling Ancient Artifacts: The Baghdad Battery

Ah the Baghdad Battery, such a simple, yet confounding object...or is it? Let's start at the beginning...or should I say beginnings? The story starts with one German artist/archaeologist Wilhelm Konig who either unearthed the vessel during an excavation in Khujut Rabu [2], or found the object in the basement of the Baghdad Museum when he took over as curator [6].... Continue Reading →

The 10 Most Not-So-Puzzling Ancient Artifacts: The Ica Stones

As we move on down the line of the 10 most not-so-puzzling ancient artifacts, we come to the Ica Stones. These are perhaps the most perplexing to me, since I don't understand how anyone can look at these and think they are real. These little gems range in size from cobbles to boulders, and depict a wide variety of images... Continue Reading →

Between the Nazca Lines: Evidence vs. “I Wanna Believe”

Well, we now know what a Cargo Cult is, and we are now up to date on the recent research into the Nasca Lines. What I haven’t brought you completely up to date on is the actual Ancient Alien Theory explanation of the Nazca lines. The History Channel sums it up pretty succinctly: Great Images being deliberately... Continue Reading →

The New York Times and Spike TV Love American Diggers, Hate Uppity, Educated Women.

So this lovely piece of journalisum came across my twitter feed today...TV Digs Will Harm Patrimony, Scholars Say by Bill Carter. First, props to Mr. Carter for using big words in the title, no props however for making it sound like the archaeologists of the world just want to take away all the fun from poor Ric Savage and... Continue Reading →

K. Kris Hirst – All About Archaeology.

It's International Women's Day today, and I thought that to celebrate I would bring you the first Women in Archaeology post about a living woman!  K. Kris Hirst was kind enough to let me interview her, and I know she's busy, so this was extra nice of her. Hirst is a content provider over at About.com, where she writes the Archaeology section of the site, and... Continue Reading →

Anne Stine Moe Ingstad

Anne Stine Moe Ingstad was born in 1918 in Lillehammer, Oppand county, Norway. Her parents were attorney Eilif Moe and Louise Augusta Bauck Lindeman. Before achieving her MA in Scandinavian Archaeology from the University of Oslo she married she married Helge Ingstad In 1941. Instead of impeding her academic career, her marriage turned out to... Continue Reading →

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