Posts Tagged With: Doug’s Archaeology

Blogging Archaeology, Good, Bad, Badder…

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The Archaeology Blogging Carnival rolls along!

If you don’t know what the Blogging Carnival is click the link to go to Doug’s Archaeology blog and read up on it. You can catch up in November’s questions and answers here.

This month we’re asked to reflect on the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of blogging archaeology.

The Good

I went into some of this in November’s question, but Doug wants us to go a little deeper.

What has been good about blogging? Well, to focus mainly on my blog and my YouTube channel before that, on top of getting to meet people from all over the world I get to hear stories from people who are really excited about what I do. For example when I went to DC. for the Reason Rally in 2012 I met several people who told me they loved what I did, and they liked that there was someone out there debunking pseudoarchaeology. Needless to say that felt really good, and it was weird to be recognized by total strangers, but fun.

Also, I recall some of the nice comments on my Mary Anning post. Apparently, one of her descendants had gotten a hold of my post and really liked what I said, and how I presented it. That felt really good.

Also, I enjoy talking with people who have questions about the topics I cover. It often leads to a back-and-forth and a few times I have learned something new.

Probably the best part was when one of my past professors told me he was teaching a “Lost Civilizations” class and he’d like to have me in the class. He’d read my blog and liked what I did. He’s even referenced me a few times online. That’s pretty damn cool for me.

Mostly though I just like doing this. I loved all this Ancient Alien, Lost Civilizations, History Mysteries, and Forbidden Archaeology as a kid. I ate it up, never missed an episode. It might have influenced me to become an archaeologist; it could have just been Harrison Ford’s chiseled jaw. Either way, this was a natural fit for me. I love looking at the mysteries, love hearing the stories, love thinking “What if?” Then I like to indulge my other great childhood passion, the Great Detective, and tear into the mysteries to find the truth (maybe that’s more X-Files).

Sometimes things don’t turn out the way I expected them too, and those are the things I really like. Take the Antikythera Mechanism for example. I was pretty convinced that it was going to be a fake, but when I researched it I found it’s quite legit. It’s also incredibly interesting to learn about, and who doesn’t like learning new things?

The Bad

What’s bad about blogging? For me it’s the opening myself up to public scrutiny.

Recently I was accused of being anonymous on my blog, which is mostly true, but there are reasons for my half-hearted attempt at anonymity. When I started ArchyFantasies I originally was making videos for YouTube, which is not a kind place to be in the first place for anyone. Now imagine being an uppity woman telling people Aliens aren’t real. Your hate mail gets pretty graphic pretty quick, and it all pretty much revolves around how you look and what kinds of adult favors you can perform, oh and rape.

So when I decided to make a blog out of the channel, because I was basically too lazy to make videos and for some reason thought it’d be easier to write a blog (silly me), I wanted to have a little more control over what people could know about me, and what they could say about me. Which is why I don’t have a picture of myself on the About page and I moderate all comments on my posts.  I still get occasional comments that are NSFW, but I have more control over them than I did on YouTube.

The Ugly

The Ugly part isn’t so ugly really. It is, however, something that irks me. The reactions I get when I mention my blog are mot always good. Mention pseudoarchaeology to some archaeologists, and you’ll be lucky to even get a funny grin. It makes it difficult to defend ‘mainstream’ archaeology to those who buy into pseudoarchaeology, when their main complaint is basically that academia is rude to them when they ask questions. People want information, and they’ll take it from wherever they can get it. Often not knowing how to spot bad sources.

I have been told that everything I am trying to do with my blog is a waste of time and that there is no point in reaching out to people who have questions about pseudoarchaeology because there are plenty of professional journals out there that deal with real science that people should be reading instead. This incredibly insulting and privilege-blind comment is something I am encountering more and more the longer I do this. These are not always aimed at me, but they almost exclusively come from those in academia and are often accompanied with the comment “I don’t like Blogs/Blogging/Bloggers.”

What’s not being taken into consideration with this kind of comment is that the average person does not have access to professional journals. Even if they did, most don’t have the education to understand what they are reading in the journals. They also don’t have the connections to simply call a professor or PhD and ask them questions about a paper with their name on it.

However, they do have access to popular books on Atlantis and poorly written ‘news’ articles on archaeological discoveries that glance over important details and sensationalize falsehoods.  They have access to Discovery and History channel and entertaining shows like American Diggers and Ancient Aliens. They have access to popular magazines that produce professional looking articles for “Forbidden” archaeology, which are glossy and exciting. They can afford to attend Cult Science conferences talking about mysterious artifacts that baffle modern archaeologists.  The average person doesn’t have access to professional archaeology, but they do have fake archaeology practically shoved in their faces.

I know I’m beating a dead horse here, but this is exactly why we need to be more active in debunking pseudoarchaeology, even if it’s just a one off post on a professional blog, or a whole channel dedicated to it. Also, we need to become more comfortable as a profession at dealing with non-academics and the public. I’ll stop here…for now…

 

Categories: Blogging, Rants | Tags: , , | 5 Comments

Weekly Round Up for 11/22/13

This week we’re bring back the round up. Fortunately my MAC project is over, so I can safely get back to doing other things with my time. Like learning more about how to use ArcGIS…yay. So what has Archy been up to in her long absence?

Blogging

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You may have seen it earlier, but I am participating in the Blogging Carnival over at Doug’s Archaeology. You can read my post here, and I encourage you to follow the link to Doug’s blog to read some of the other posts as well.

I’ve also added a new Founding  Mother to our Women in Archaeology series. Go check her out, she’s a snappy dresser!

And we take a look at more viking pseudoarchaeology in the next instalment of Where the Vikings Weren’t, this time we’re back in Canada.

Podcast

The CRM Podcast is still going strong. We had our first all woman show about a month ago, it was very well received, and the second show was equally enjoyed. In the most recent episode we’re discussing Graduate School Applications, and how to pick what you want to do with your life. You can check out all the episodes at the links, or subscribe on almost any of the podcast apps out there.

Also, I got permission to used the theme music I wanted for my own podcast, so look forward to that in the new year! (I still need a good name.)

Twitter

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I’ve started a new thing on Twitter that seems to be popular, it an #ArchaeologyChat! For those who don’t know what that is, it’s like a chat room on twitter, only it’s public and you have to use the hashtag to make sure your comments get seen. It’s been really great so far, we’ve had two chats now, and I’ve learned how to archive them on Storify. If you’d like to read over the last two chats, just follow the links!

First ever #ArchaeologyChat!

#ArchaeologyChat for 11/20/2013

Reading

I haven’t been able to get much done here, but I’ve got some interesting articles in the cue. Hopefully I’ll  be able to get to those this next week and I’ll give you my take on them.

All you ever wanted to know at Lininations at Mound A.

All you ever wanted to know at Lininations at Mound A.

So, there you go. I’ve been pretty busy with my MAC Poster and all, and I am working on another poster for the spring. Such is life I guess, now that I’m a graduate all I do is one project after another. Still, it beats being bored!

Categories: Weekly News Round Up | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Debunking, Blogging, and Public Outreach: Blogging Archaeology Carnival 2014!

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Sadly, I won’t be making the SAA‘s in Texas next year. Neither will my friend Doug over at Doug’s Archaeology, but he came up with a great idea for those of us who can’t make, something called a blogging carnival and he’s hosting the first round of questions for November (Which is also Movember, so get to growing guys).  If you’re a blogger focused on archaeology, you should definitely head over to his post about the carnival and join in. As for me:

To Blog or not To Blog.

I’m not sure I’ve ever done a whole post explaining this. It’s kind of hidden all over the blog in the About sections and such.  I started this blog 4 years (going on 5) ago now because I got really excited about the Skeptical and Atheist movements on the internet. I started with making videos on YouTube, which take a lot of time to make and edit. I didn’t really like it, and personally, the Atheist and Skeptical communities on YouTube started having issues and I didn’t really want to be part of the in-fighting, so I bowed out. I’m a writer anyway. Blogging just seemed like a natural choice to jump too.

When I made the decision to open this blog I realized I had to revamp the way I was doing things. I original wanted to create a space where people could come and get solid information on topics that are often avoided or not thought about by professional archaeologists.  Blogging is a great place for this; citations appear in-line, references are written out, you can link to important sites, also the text of the blog is searchable, and you can link things together easier. Blogging was just the better medium for a topic as difficult as debunking.

Blogs also allow for better organization of topics. I handle several reoccurring topics here, the two biggest being Women in Archaeology and Weird Archaeology which both branch into subtopics like Mother’s of the Field and The 10 Most Not-So-Puzzling Ancient Artifacts. I can group all of the individual posts together to make them more readable as groups, not something easily done on YouTube at the time.  I also have more control over the blog. I can moderate the comments better, respond quicker, and in general have better conversations with my readers.

You Haven’t Left Yet?

Why am I still blogging? Because I feel I am filling a gap in the archaeological community.

We archaeologists tend to forget that there are people out there who are not archaeologists, and who don’t understand why we say the things we do. There are a lot of blogs out there in the topic of archaeology and CRM that mainly focus on discussing the topic among educated archaeologists. I learn a lot about sub-fields and new research techniques, all of which is perfectly understandable to me because I’ve done this a while now. But if you’re just a random person with an interest in archaeology and you don’t want to be talked to like a 1st grader, there isn’t a whole lot out there aimed at you.

I’m not knocking websites and organizations that try to teach kids about archaeology, I even do it in my spare time. But a 30 year old isn’t a child.

Carl Sagan mentioned in his book Demon Haunted World how he got picked up at the airport by a driver who was completely ignorant of science, yet loved the topic. The only sources of information on the topic of science this driver had access to were pseudoscience and woo. Sagan didn’t blame the driver for his lack of formal education, he blamed the scientific community for not providing better access to real science to the lay person.

We have a very similar problem in the Archaeological community. Because we are not more accessible to the public we have issues with aliens, Atlantians, ethnocentrism, looting, and validating our field of study to governments. The other side of this coin is that we so rarely prepare students and professionals to talk with members of the public. We’re great talking to each other and presenting papers and posters, but when was the last time you genuinely explained to an individual outside of our community why we don’t dig for dinosaurs or pan for gold? People don’t know how we know what we know, and they are earnestly interested. I’m not saying things aren’t improving as time goes on, but it’s not where I think it should be yet.

Kenneth Feder in a recent article in the SAA’s membership magazine made a call for archaeologists to really step up to the plate. He took the responsibility of knowing bad archaeology from good away from the lay person and placed it squarely with us. We need to answer the awkward questions about the unintentional racism in ‘alternate  explanations’ for the building of Native earthworks. We need to answer the strange questions about ancient alien technology. We need to explain simple terms and concepts to  lay people because they don’t know what we do. We need to do this with a touch of humor and a lot of solid information, people like information.

So that’s why I’m still here. I like tackling psuedoarchaeology, it’s always entertaining and it’s a great way to teach critical thinking. I like talking about women archaeologists because it’s a giant hole in our history and it helps show people that there is more to archaeology then a bunch of stuffy old white guys (nothing against the stuffy old white guys in archaeology).

I’m going to keep at this too, for basically the same reasons, expanding the focus of this blog as I go. I’m thinking T-shirts…

Categories: Archaeology, Blogging, Rants | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Interesting things that have happened this week.

Firstly, we’ve records and ArcheoWebby has post the new podcast I’m going to be on. You can find it over at Random Acts of Science, aka Dig Tech. You can find the podcast here. We talk a lot about looters and public archaeology with Chirs, Doug, and myself. Personally I had a blast making this podcast, and I can’t wait to do more. 

Also check out Doug’s blog over at Doug’s Archaeology and Chris’ blog over at Random Acts of Science/ DigTech

Secondly, HOLY CRAP my blog blew up! Srly, 750+ views today and still counting! I’m not sure who gave me the bump, but thanks a bunch!

Thirdly, Since I was checking my exploding views today I wanted to see what people were looking at, and apparently everyone is fascinated with the Coso Artifact. I’m glad everyone enjoy’s my write up on the little Spark-plug that could. It was fun to write about, and yah, it’s cool how it formed and all that. Feel free to lave me questions about it if you have any.

So that’s pretty much it for the week. I needed the down time to catch up with some school work and all. But, the  next week we’ll be back on schedule  no worries. Till then go listen to my awesome  podcast and rate us. Oh, and thanks for visiting!

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | 3 Comments

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