Tag Archives: ArchyFantasies Podcasts

The Hunt For Secret Mysteries: Skinwalker Ranch Pt1 with Bill Auchter.

Today we start a brand-new collaborative project with Archaeothoughts and ArchaeoRPG which is a podcast miniseries we are calling The Hunt for Secret Mysteries. This miniseries will focus on various paranormal TV shows as we are inflicted with them. My cohost will be Bill Auchter of Archaeothoughts and for our first series, we’re focusing on the new television show “The Secrets of Skinwalker Ranch”. We hope you enjoy this brand-new miniseries and hope you stick around for the full set.

Bill Auchter can be found:

Twitter – @archaeothoughts

Patreon –https://www.patreon.com/archaeothoughts

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp0zGwylRsKCkxbMSUE2a0Q

Twitch – https://www.twitch.tv/archaeothoughts/

Hi! I’m an archaeologist who likes games, video games, gaming, horror, the supernatural, and debunking pseudoarchaeology. Check out my vids for more on the above topics, and toss us a coin if you like what I do.

Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/Archyfantasies

Ko-Fi – https://ko-fi.com/archyfantasies

Twitch – https://www.twitch.tv/archyfantasies

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/ArchyFantasies

Twitter – @ArchyFantasies

IG – @ArchyFantasies

Website – https://archyfantasies.com/

Email – ArchyFantasies@gmail.com. 

Pseudo TV with Annelise Baer

Today we talk with Annelise Baer about some behind the scenes aspects of making Pseudo-television shows like Ancient Aliens. She tells how the research and some of the production is done, and we talk about what Archaeology could learn from tv. 

 Show Notes:

Annelise Baer, MA

Twitter – @annelisebaer

IMBD –  https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3243785/ 

Crystal Skull Vodka facial reconstruction:

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS805US805&sxsrf=ACYBGNS7RKZgqGAzRarBKuzV6qbOTr8Enw:1581389394615&q=crystal+skull+reconstruction&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiWi_jIvsjnAhWjxFkKHct5BYwQsAR6BAgJEAE&biw=1564&bih=754&dpr=1.13

Goodbye 2019, Hello 2020! Archaeological Fantasies Podcast Ep 109

Say Hello to the new year with Archaeological Fantasies.  Check us out to see what we’re up to and what to expect in the new year. 

Thanks again to all our lovely supporters! Here’s to another successful year. 

Show Notes!

Jennifer Raff:  @JenniferRaff 

https://violentmetaphors.com/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenniferraff/#2b40d9503eef

David Anderson:  @DSAArchaeology 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidanderson/#5171d0495401

In reSearch Of

https://www.patreon.com/inresearchof/

Archaeological Fantasies on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtKt4NakeiCynKLPGQH0AZw

Sub-Blogs:

Ancient Alien Archaeology

https://ancientalienarchaeology.home.blog/

The Archaeology of Giants

https://thearchaeologyofgiants.home.blog/

Paranormal Archaeology

https://paranormalarchaeology.wordpress.com/

We’re on YouTube again!

If you’d like to support the Podcast or site, consider donating to us on Patreon or buy us a  Ko-Fi. Either option helps us out.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on the blog and like and share us where ever you can.

You can follow us on twitter @ArchyFantasies, or look us up on Facebook.

You can reach us by email at ArchyFantasies@gmail.com.

Contact us below or leave a comment.

Archaeological Fantasies 2018 Year in Review.

We did a lot this year on the blog and the podcast, not to mention personally.

We moved to Philadelphia, continued in grad school, went to several conferences, had a litter of kittens...

On the ArchyFantasies side, we moved the Podcast to an independent platform, reached out to several new guests and hosts, really launched our Pateron and in general really liked the way the podcast and the blog have expanded.

It thought it might be interesting to look back at the past year and see what our most popular articles and podcast episodes were. I was expecting a fair amount of overlap, but there was a kind of divide between my podcast and my blog.

Top Ten (11) Podcast Episodes in 2018:

Top Ten Blog Posts for 2018:

I’m glad to see such a variety of topics being enjoyed by folks on the podcast. Everything this year from our first episode to the emerging study of Archaeogaming. There’s a pretty wide variety there too, one I don’t really see in the blog.

The 10 Most Not-So-Puzzling Ancient Artifacts series is still going strong, and frankly, I blame Ancient Aliens. But hey, they’re driving people to my blog so…

I am glad to see criticism of Legends of the Lost is doing well too. They’re the top posts by almost double the others. That’s hearting.

Keeping it brief here, I like the way things are going here, but I can also see clear trends that people appear to want, given the medium. So saying, I’ve got several new and, hopefully, exciting new things to try with the podcast and blog, but we won’t be losing our staples either.

All that said, into the New Year we go! Thanks to everyone who has supported us this far, stick with us for more Archaeology, outreach, and plain old fun!

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If you’d like to support the Podcast or blog, consider donating to us on Patreon or buy us a  Ko-Fi. Either option helps us out.

Grab a t-shirt or coffee mug from our Swag Store on Zazzle.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on the blog at www.ArchyFantasies.com and like and share us where ever you can.

You can follow us on twitter @Archyfantsies, or look us up on Facebook. You can reach us by email at ArchyFantasies@gmail.com.

Contact us below or leave a comment.



New Archaeo-Genetics Articles With Jennifer Raff

Today, Dr. Jennifer Raff is back with us to talk about some recent articles on genetics in archaeology. Particularly the discovery of a new genetic ancestor to early Americans and new evidence about the migration of early Americans. 

Show Notes:

Jennifer Raff at Forbes

Ancient DNA Reveals Yet More Complicated Histories In The Americas

Posth et al. 2018. Reconstructing the Deep Population History of Central and South America.

Moreno-Mayar et al. 2018. Early human dispersals within the Americas.

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If you’d like to support the Podcast or site, consider donating to us on Patreon or buy us a  Ko-Fi. Either option helps us out.

Grab a t-shirt or coffee mug from our Swag Store on Zazzle.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on the blog at www.ArchyFantasies.com and like and share us where ever you can.

You can follow us on twitter @Archyfantsies, Jeb J. Card @ahtzib ,  Ken Feder @fiftysitesbook or look us up on Facebook. You can reach us by email at ArchyFantasies@gmail.com

Contact us below or leave a comment.

Archaeogaming with Andrew Reinhard – Archaeological Fantasies Ep 97

Today we talk with Andrew Reinhard about his new book Archaeogaming: An Introduction to Archaeology in and of Video Games.

We talk about the Atari ET dig, learn how Metaspace and Meat Space are similar, and talk a lot about No Man’s Sky and Andrew’s archaeological survey inside the game space.

 

Show Notes and links of interest:

Andrew Reinhard:

Archaeogaming with Andrew Reinhard (Video)

Meet the Archaeologist: Andrew Reinhard (Video)

The Interactive Pasts Conference: Andrew Reinhard (Video)

Andrew Reinhard on Twitter @adreinhard 

Andrew’s Book on Amazon Archaeogaming: An Introduction to Archaeology in and of Video Games.

Atari ET Dig:

Atari video game burial

HOW OBSESSED FANS FINALLY EXHUMED ATARI’S SECRET GAME GRAVEYARD

No Man’s Sky Archaeological Survey:

A Procedurally Generated Archaeology Mission in No Man’s Sky

Archeologist Digs Into Remains of No Man’s SkyAbandoned Player Civilization

The No Man’s Sky Archaeological Survey: One Year In

My Archaeological Methodology in No Man’s Sky

Other Things of interest:

8 Bit Test Pit Podcast with Meghan Dennis, Tara Copplestone, and Andrew Reinhard

Hashtags to Follow:

#archaeogaming

#archaeotwitter

#archaeologyTwitter


Thank You for listening.

If you’d like to support the Podcast, condenser donating to us on Patreon:  https://www.patreon.com/Archyfantasies or buy us a  Ko-Fi : https://ko-fi.com/A8833HAS . Either option helps us out.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on the blog at www.ArchyFantasies.com and like and share us where ever you can.

You can follow us on twitter @Archyfantsies or look us up on Facebook and you can reach us by email at ArchyFantasies@gmail.com

Theme Music was provided by ArcheoSoup Productions

This episode was produced and edited by Sara Head.

Contact us below or leave a comment.


Unlucky Mummies Get a Bad Wrap.

 

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On episode 52 of the Archaeological Fantasies Podcast we talk about Mummies!

We all think we know about the story of King Tut, but a lot of it was embellishment at the time, as well as confusing the story of Tut’s discovery with stories of other mummies at the time. Ken, Jeb, and I talk about the reality of the Mummy’s curse, in this episode. We’re also able to sus out where some of the myths about the Mummy’s curse come from, who probably started them. We also make some possible connections between King Tut and Cthulhu (noting a trend?) and talk about the long term impacts of the idea of the mummy. It’s a great episode, go give it a listen!

DNA in Archaeology with Jennifer Raff

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Episode 50 of the Archaeological Fantasies is live, and Ken and I were able to finally sit down with someone who knows quite a bit about the use of DNA and genetics in archaeology. Jennifer Raff, who’s covered all this wonderfully over at her own blog Violent Metaphors, was just the podcast guest I’ve been looking for to help us sus out all the ins and outs of genetic evidence in archaeology.

We’ve mentioned Jennifer and her co-author Deborah A. Bolnick’s work before when Ken and I talked about the Solutrean-Clovis hypothesis. Her and Dr. Bolnick’s paper really digs into the supposed genetics that are supposed to support this rather flawed hypothesis.

I’m not going to rehash all of this in this post, Jennifer has done the lion’s share on her blog and paper, and then again on the podcast. I suggest you go give it all a read and a listen. It really clarifies questions I had about ancient genetics and prehistoric DNA.


If you’d like to support this blog, consider donating on Patreon.
Comment below or send an email to ArchyFantasies@gmail.com


The Pyramids That Are Not, The Bosnian Pyramids.

Episode 29 of the Archaeology Fantasies Podcast is live. If you haven’t given it a listen, go do it now! I apologize ahead of time for the fact that I can’t say Sam Osmanagich’s name correctly.

hills

We’re talking about the Bosnian Pyramids.

For those who don’t know, the Bosnian Pyramids are not actual pyramids, they are a cluster of natural hills in central Bosnia and Herzegovina that started life off roughly pyramid in shape. I say they started that way because years of “excavation” on the hills has transformed them into what Sam Osmanagich, the ‘founder’ of said not-pyramids, wants them to be.

Osmanagich has decided that several of the hills in the range are actually pyramids and he’s renamed them as he sees fit. Visocica Hill, at 720 feet, is renamed the Pyramid of the Sun. Pljesevica Hill, at 350 feet, is renamed the Pyramid of the Moon. He claims there are others, a Pyramid of Love, A Pyramid of Earth, one to a Dragon, ect. I’m not entirely sure why any of them have the names that they do, but it made sense to Osmanagich, so we’ll run with it.

Osmanagich also makes the claim that there are labyrinths under the pyramids and long man-made tunnels. These tunnels supposedly connected the pyramids at one point and then filled in with sea water when the glaciers melted.

Let me state here that no professional archaeologist believes these are pyramids, calling it:

“A cruel hoax on an unsuspecting public [which] has no place in the world of genuine science (Bohannon 2006).”

That hasn’t stopped Osmanagich, who in true fringe style has tried to connect the names of actual archaeologist, geologists, and other scientists to his work. Most have either denied association with the project or been exposed as either unqualified or frauds (Rose 2006).

But what of the claims?

Aside from claiming hills are pyramids when they are clearly not, Osmanagich claims they are the oldest pyramids in the world. He says they are 12,000 years old putting their construction during a time when most of Europe was under a glacier and agriculture wasn’t really a thing yet (Woodward 2009). I’ve never really seen how he proposes prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers managed to build the largest pyramids on earth or why they would bother. He’s made a lukewarm argument that they are burial mounds, but there are no bodies associated with them.

What’s more, these incredibly advanced Hunter-Gatherers also apparently knew how to make and pour cement, and that is how they covered the sides of the pyramids (Woodward 2009). Never-mind that the geology of the hills matches that of the surrounding area, and the ‘cement’ Osmanagich is finding is actually alternating layers of conglomerate, clay and sandstone (Woodward 2009). Osmanagich’s cement idea is supported by French materials scientist, Joseph Davidovits, who also thinks the real pyramids in Egypt were made with poured concrete blocks (Woodward 2009). Because of this idea, Osmanagich instructed his workers to carve the hillside to create the impression of a stepped pyramid for the Pyramid of the Moon (Woodward 2009). So, like other fringe researchers in the past, he’s altered the area to fit his expectations, and then wants to pass it off as being authentic.

In this vein, Osmanagich has started digging in the ‘tunnels’ beneath the hills. Stating that he is going to widen these tunnels and extend them so that they will connect  witht the other pyramids (Woodward 2009),  never mind if they don’t currently. He claims that there are boulders that bear carvings that date back to 15,000 years ago, but that claim was challenged by a geologist and former employee who claimed the carvings appeared overnight, put there by another one of Osmanagich’s workers (Woodward 2009).

Yet Osmanagich is unapologetic in his blatant alteration of the area, and why shouldn’t he be?

Osmanagich says he plans to dig all the way to Visocica Hill, 1.4 miles away, adding that, with additional donations, he could reach it in as few as three years. “Ten years from now nobody will remember my critics,” he says as we start back toward the light, “and a million people will come to see what we have.” (Woodward 2009)

Osmanagich has official backing from the Bosnian Government (Woodward 2009). The Pyramid of the Sun Foundation, owned by Osmanagich, rakes in hundreds of thousands of dollars in public donations and thousands more from state-owned companies (Woodward 2009). He’s got copious amounts of attention from the media and was awarded a seat on a scientific council in Russia (Woodward 2009). Creating fake archaeology and history is quite lucrative.

All that said, Osmanagich still can’t answer basic questions about the construction of the site. Things like, where did the workers come from? Where did they live while they worked? Who fed them? How did they make the cement? Where are the mixing stations, the pouring platforms, the tools? Where is the trash from all these people living one place? Where is the graveyard for the workers that died? Who organized them? What compelled them to build? And so on, and so on, and so on.

As is so often with the fringe, they see something big and shinny, and don’t think about the details. The details that real archaeologists want, the details that are real evidence. The details that every actual archaeological site possesses. These are always lacking because they are overlooked. As Ken likes to say, you can fake an artifact, but you can’t fake a whole site. Osmanagich had already run up against this with the international archaeological community, and it’s starting to catch up to him at home as well. We’ll just wait and see were all this ends up, but I’m guessing it’s not going to end well.

In the meantime go listen to episode 29 of the Archaeology Fantasies Podcast and hear what Ken and I have to say on the matter.


If you’d like to support this blog, consider donating on Patreon.
Want more on this topic? Go to: Mystery Sites That Aren’t.
Comment below or send an email to ArchyFantasies@gmail.com


Resources:

Bosnian Pyramids Website.
http://www.bosnianpyramids.org/. Accessed 2/19/16

Open Protest Letter to the Bosnian Government. written by the The European Association of Archaeologists – (EAA)
 http://www.robertschoch.net/bosnia%20eaa%20denounces%20semir%20osmanagic%20pyramid%20archaeology%20dowell%20ct.htm. Accessed 2/19/16

Woodard, Colin
The Mystery of Bosnia’s Ancient Pyramids. Smithsonian Magazine Online. December 2009. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-mystery-of-bosnias-ancient-pyramids-148990462/#6JECjwhBkxuU6aDb.99. Accessed 2/19/16

Rose, Mark
2006    Bosnian “Pyramids” Update. Archaeology Magazine Online. 14 June 2006.
http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/osmanagic/update.html. Accessed 2/19/16

John Bohannon, 2006 “Researchers Helpless as Bosnian Pyramid Bandwagon Gathers Pace”. Science. 314:1862. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/314/5807/1862.1 Accessed 2/19/16

 

The Coso Artifact! Now for your Ears!

The Archaeology Fantasies Podcast episode 10 is live, (so I might have skipped #9 by accident…oops)

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This episode Ken and I chew over the Coso Artifact. It’s a fun episode since, as per the blog post on this topic, we already know what it really is. We still look over the origin story and the impact this little Oopart has today.

On an important note, The Archaeology Podcast Network is looking for people willing donate time to edit all of our wonderful and informative podcasts, including this one. If you’ve got the know-how to edit a .wav file and create a cohesive show out of our run-on sentences, drop Chris an email at chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com and make sure to put “Show Editing” in the subject line.

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Want more on this topic? Go to ArchyFantasies Podcasts.

If you want to send us your questions or comments email us at archyfantasies@gmail.com.