Hindu Corn Goddesses and Tobacco Mummies: New World Plants and Old World Trade.

The second article in The Lost History of Ancient America is titled 'Plants Connect the Old and New Worlds'. It's penned by Dr. Carl L. Johannessen (2017), a retired professor of geography from the University of Oregon. Johannessen's article is the longest in the first section of the book and claims that there are 14 plants that were present in... Continue Reading →

Advertisements

DNA in Archaeology with Jennifer Raff

Episode 50 of the Archaeological Fantasies is live, and Ken and I were able to finally sit down with someone who knows quite a bit about the use of DNA and genetics in archaeology. Jennifer Raff, who's covered all this wonderfully over at her own blog Violent Metaphors, was just the podcast guest I've been looking for to help us sus out all the ins and outs of genetic evidence in archaeology

The Dubious Mystery of Mystery Hill and America’s Stonehenge.

Now dubbed "America's Stonehenge" in Salem, New Hampshire, the location once known as Mystery Hill continues to draw tourists to what is touted as being evidence of pre-Columbian contact. Evidence of who is still up for debate. The site itself is about 30 acres of land just off route 111 in Salem. It's a sprawling complex of stone structures, walls, natural caves, and some... Continue Reading →

Andy White, Podcasts, and Debunking Roman Swords.

Pulitzer claims that he's found a Roman sword that is "100 per cent confirmed (Gadd 2015, Zolfagharifard 2015)" and that is "the smoking gun to his theory (Gadd 2015, Zolfagharifard 2015)". He says that the sword was discovered in a shipwreck just off the coast of Oak Island, and apparently made this announcement on the History Channel's show Curse of Oak Island (Gadd 2015, Zolfagharifard 2015). It doesn't take long for this claim to start unraveling though, and unraveling in such a spectacular way at that.

The Newberry Tablet

While I was critiquing the 3rd episode of America Unearthed Season 1, I came upon a few new artifacts/concepts in pseudoarchaeology. One in particular caught my attention, because as I worked to debunk it, the red flags around it grew. I realized that it really needs it’s own entry into the blog, because there is... Continue Reading →

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: